Grace Poe, citizenship is a legal issue, but also an emotional one

A few days ago, I wrote what I thought should be a pre-requisite for those who wants to become president of my country, the Philippines. I asked, “Why can’t we place a higher standard of nationalism on them, too? Like expecting a candidate to must have never thought about dropping their being a Filipino, even on paper, just because it’s admittedly more convenient (or inconvenient, for those who have the means to choose it to be that way for them) elsewhere?”

It looks like Prof. Randy David agrees with this line of thought, as he wrote in his recent piece at the Inquirer:

Citizenship is a legal issue, but also an emotional one. I am not a lawyer, but I think Sen. Grace Poe’s eligibility for an elective position in the legislature or the presidency is arguable using RA 9225. That law permitted her to regain her status as a natural-born citizen of this country. But those who oppose her on citizenship grounds will likely ask whether someone who renounced and later reacquired Philippine citizenship can still be considered a natural-born citizen as defined by the 1987 Constitution. Here’s what Article IV, Section 2, says: “Natural-born citizens are those who are citizens of the Philippines from birth without having to perform any act to acquire or perfect their Philippine citizenship.”

Questions: If you renounced and lost your citizenship—and later reacquired it after applying and taking an oath—wouldn’t the latter be regarded as performing an “act to acquire or perfect” one’s citizenship? Doesn’t renouncing your citizenship mean canceling your allegiance to your mother country? And isn’t that the reason for taking the oath of allegiance when you apply to regain it?

… I nonetheless find it reasonable that the Constitution requires more from those aspiring for the highest offices of the republic. They must be free of the stain of dual allegiance. Grace has to find a convincing way to respond, for example, to the late Supreme Court Justice Isagani Cruz’s contention that “Philippine citizenship previously disowned is not that cheaply recovered.”

Read more: http://opinion.inquirer.net/87575/natural-born-citizen#ixzz3ifh07tF8

It’s not a question whether Grace Poe deserves to be president even if she’s a fondling. To me, being fondling is not an issue. It’s her abandoning her Filipino citizenship at one point in her life that should be a real issue.

As Prof. Randy David eloquently puts it: citizenship is a legal issue, but also an emotional one.

Do you really want a former US Citizen as a Philippine president?

Do you really want a former US Citizen as a Philippine president? Seriously.

Some might say that I’m insulting those who chose to be a US Citizens. That I’m questioning their nationalism.

A shot at Grace Poe’s citizenship history is not a shot against Filipinos who chose to be citizens of the United States of America or elsewhere. I personally know of people, even close friends and relatives, that are already US citizens but are very much still a Filipino, loves the Philippines and very much involved in the affairs of the country.

However, to be US Citizen (even if she dropped it because of a government position) AND aspire to be the Philippine president is another thing. It’s an oxymoron.

Do you really want to have a former US Citizen to lead our country? A first family who’s half of its members pledged allegiance to a country other than our own?

We put a higher standard to our Presidents. We want them to be incorruptible. Someone with integrity. We want them to be highly competent. Sincere beyond doubt.

Why can’t we place a higher standard of nationalism on them, too? Like expecting a candidate to must have never thought about dropping their being a Filipino, even on paper, just because it’s admittedly more convenient (or inconvenient, for those who have the means to choose it to be that way for them) elsewhere?

Do you really want a former US Citizen as a Philippine president? Really?

PNoy deserves our respect. He earned it.

Some of the few things against President Noynoy Aquino during his ‪#‎SONA2015‬:

1. Always referencing Gloria and her mistakes
2. Grabbing credit from previous administration’s programs.
3. Never admitting his mistake

In fairness to this President, hindi ko naman narinig sa SONA nya na inaangkin nya lahat ng ideas. In fact, the “Pantawid Gutom” program started with Gloria. What he was emphasising is the efficient implementation of programs sans what we have grown accustomed to — corruption. The pantawid gutom program has grown since then, efficiently without corruption.

Kaya I understand kung palaging may reference kay Gloria. It’s a communication technique. Highlighting the good as against what was previously bad. He has to highlight the difference so we’ll get to love what we have now and never return to what was. Yan kasi ang gusto nyang maging legacy, his fight against corruption.
He also did say that he’s not perfect. And we should not assume that he is. I do see several obvious mistakes. But then, we can’t also expect him to enumerate his mistakes in his SONA. Let’s be honest — mukha naman yata hindi bagay yon. Let the people judge if his mistakes overshadowed the good things his administration has been doing.

But I get it why some people hate him. Ganon talaga eh. We’ll never be contented. And it’s a good thing in a lot of ways. I just hope that we’ll give this Administration the credit that is due them. For sometime now, we finally have a president that we can respect. Let’s give respect. He is, in the first place OUR president.

Easter Sunday — it’s for you whether you like it or not

TODAY, RESURRECTION SUNDAY, WE CELEBRATE THE MOST SIGNIFICANT EVENT IN HUMAN HISTORY. SIGNIFICANT NOT ONLY FOR SOME, BUT FOR ALL!

IF YOU’RE A FOLLOWER OF JESUS, there will be times in your life where you’ll feel troubled, burdened, even depressed. Remember however, that your savior is not dead. He is alive today — loving you, caring for you and walking with you through hard times.

IF YOU’RE SORT OF A FOLLOWER OF JESUS, remember that Jesus is alive today, he’s not a joke. He demands full commitment, not half-heartedness. Either you follow him or not at all. If he’s truly alive today, you should take that seriously.

IF YOU’RE NOT A FOLLOWER OF JESUS, what we celebrate today also affects your life. You might want to consider, if what we claim is not true, we’re just a bunch of lunatic. And with the rest of the people who lived from 2000 years ago, you have the right to laugh at us. However, if what we believe truly happened — that our Master has risen from the dead, it has eternal implications. He claims that he is the way, the truth and the life, and that no one comes to the father except through him. You then have to decide whether to believe him or not.